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Archery World Charity Shoot Donation

$1.00

Type: Donation
SKU: 7616
Help us honor the memory of Emmett Ewing Scott and donate to defeat SIDS. Donate $1 or $50, click the quantity button as many times as you'd like, 100% of proceeds go to First Candle, a national nonprofit charity committed to the elimination of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, Sudden Unexpected Infant Death,...

Help us honor the memory of Emmett Ewing Scott and donate to defeat SIDS.

Donate $1 or $50, click the quantity button as many times as you'd like, 100% of proceeds go to First Candle, a national nonprofit charity committed to the elimination of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, Sudden Unexpected Infant Death, and Stillbirth.

 

The Mag and Mike Story

I met Maggie in 2006. I was working my way through college as a gillnet deckhand on the west side of Kodiak island, AK. she was in graduate school in New York City and I was working on my degree in agriculture in central Kentucky while wintering in my hometown, Sylva, NC. My boss in Kodiak was her dad. I eventually mustered the guts to ask him if it was ok if I took her out on a date and he agreed good-naturedly. After a summer of sporadic dates, she left for Africa for seven months to finish her practicum for her masters and we kept in touch whenever we could (my cell phone bills averaged $600/month during that time and I wasn't at all a wealthy guy). When she got back from Africa and came back to New York, we decided that we wanted to be closer to each other and she took a job with the center for disease control and prevention in Atlanta, GA. I was still 3 hours away but I felt worlds closer than NYC or Africa. We did the long distance thing for the next 3 years. Either I went to Atlanta for the weekend or she came to me in western North Carolina EVERY. SINGLE. WEEKEND. For 3 years. 

I popped the question finally and we then had some decisions to make about the future. Maggie had some family here in the Portland area and I would rather take a beating than live in Atlanta, so we decided to come west. I went fishing in Kodiak one more time and we were married on the 6th of September in 2013 on the Kenai Peninsula. I quickly found work in the bustling craft brew scene here and life was awesome.

This is the sad part of the story and isn't easy for me to talk about in person.  

On September 1, 2015, Emmett Ewing Scott was born and was absolutely perfect in every way. Healthy as a horse and developing precociously. He had the most genuine smile I have ever seen and likely ever will. He won the hearts of perfect strangers instantly and effortlessly. We enrolled him in daycare at 3 months old because we are both working people.  

On April 11th 2015, I went to work as usual and was just starting to wrap up my day in the early afternoon. Around 3 pm, I checked my phone and discovered I had 3 missed calls from Maggie. I called back right away and she frantically told me that she had been called by the daycare and that Emmett had never woken up from his nap, and that they had called 911 and he was being taken to Emmanuel children's hospital. I panicked and took off to the hospital only to get stuck in gridlocked traffic. Once I finally got there, they had my boy on the table and a small army of doctors and nurses were trying to resuscitate him. After what seemed like forever but was probably only a few minutes, the head doctor turned to Maggie and I with a look of defeat that I will try to forget forever but never will and pronounced him to be dead. Images from that day will bother me for the rest of my life.

Anyhow, anytime a child dies in Multnomah county, a full criminal investigation is done by the authorities. The initial diagnosis was SIDS. Sudden/unexplained infant death syndrome. It took the law almost a month to complete the investigation, but eventually the daycare was completely exonerated of any negligence. His caregivers there loved him as much as everyone else did.

That's the damnable misery of this deal. It wasn't anyone's fault, yet a perfect child died anyway, and that's why I feel like this tournament needs to happen. To help the scientific community raise money to figure why this happens and also to help families who experience this get through it.

That's probably way more information than you needed, but that's the whole story. With the help of incredible family and friends and people like yourself and Megan, we will get through this, raise the next child as best we can and do everything we can to prevent this, but also to help other SIDS families.